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File: 1516061655985.jpg (27.73 KB, 546x520, 1441244359256.jpg)

 No.18450

Do you think our society likes to glorify mental illness/depression/anxiety? I sometimes think they do because I've seen normalfags really like to talk about their crippling anxiety and depression (although it could also be the noted rise of depression and mental illness among the newer generations). Not only that, but people's interest in things like outsider artists and the tortured artist stereotype. Is it just normal people wanting their boring lives to be more interesting?

 No.18452

In mainstream American culture, yes. We like to be edgy about things like Columbine, we find power in the willingness to self-destruct and hurt others, and we have a weird fetish for having to overcome suffering. I've seen a lot of people get shamed because their parents gave them a decent start in life. Which is weird, seeing how much supposed value we place on pro-child parenting and parental sacrifice. I think this worship of adversity in particular comes from our cultural idolization of the underdog/dark horse. Which itself stems from the "land of opportunity" meme and good old-fashioned Christian ideological roots.

I actually admire African American culture for its stigmatization of mental illness and the expression of suffering. Oddly enough, the people that have gotten fucked with constantly for the last 500 years have quite a strong sense of compassion fatigue. Lots of people that need help don't get it, yeah, but the "walk it off" mentality is very refreshing.

 No.18453

>>18452
I'm been shamed on this literal website for receiving help from my parents, not to mention society at large

People have an obsession with having others "do the right thing" by putting other people ahead of themselves, but that makes no sense whatsoever. People don't expect wild animals to put other organisms ahead of themselves but people expect this from humans. It's a uniquely human maladaptation that applies to humans that causes them to ask the purpose for their existence.

Frankly I'm pretty goddamn sick of this and I've gotten screwed over so many times through the years due to this attitude; no more. Society had it from me but beat it out of me.

 No.18457

This thread is getting wildly off-topic, so i'm gonna try to reign it in.
>>18450
Mental illness is seen as abnormal and therefore interesting. Just like how people might fatasize about rape, they like to imagine a glamouized version of something they see as outside their grasp. It's simply human nature and it does not end at mental illness. Societies also fetishize taboo to an extent, which only amplifies this.
>>18452
>I actually admire African American culture
lol. There's nothing admirable about a primitive and destructive mindset. Japanese culture is similar in its stigmatization of mental illness and that largely contributes to their suicide rates. We now know that mental illness is not caused by character flaws in the sufferer. A culture that does not acknowledge and change to accommodate new, factual information is lesser for it. Ideally, society would neither stigmatize nor fetishize mental illness and instead recognize it for what it is and place treatment of sufferers above personal biases.
>>18453
Have you never heard of ants or any type of animal with a societal structure? Humans are all one species and most of us are a part of society. Also, it's pretty dumb to say that humans should be lead by nature's example. Should we start throwing shit at each other too? Human's capacity to place the greater good above themselves is part of what makes us superior to other species.

 No.18472

Depression is definitely romanticized because, despite being really frequent, it's also very misunderstood. Pretty much every other mental illness is heavily ostracizing, and mentally ill people are a vulnerable minority.

/thread

 No.18488

File: 1516164593254.jpg (189.26 KB, 1920x1080, watashi.jpg)

I feel like, pertaining to such taboo subjects such as metal illness, rape, PTSD, crime (to name a few), society likes to glorify the aesthetics of such things. There's the stereotypical image of the tortured artist, sexual gratification, the glory of war, vigilante justice and more. We like these things in the abstract for what they represent in our minds. They appeal to our many repressed sensibilities. This arises through a detached concept of what these subjects actually entail.

 No.18490

>>18453
I mean, I know that feel. I was raised in a downwardly-mobile lower middle class household and my single mother still berated me for having things and not wörk wörk wörking every second of my life away. I remember how ashamed I felt for not qualifying for lunch assistance at school, even though I didn't have food to bring. Kids would give me shit for living in an owned (yet underwater) home instead of a rented apartment or trailer. It was like, fuck, if the world sees me as a spoiled brat, can I at least have a college fund or cable television?

But when I met guys who had it better than me, yeah I sneered at them just like everyone else. Even though I knew it was wrong.
>>18457
Attitudes like that further fuel the cagey mentality of the modern Black person. Getting these people on their feet required more than breaking their chains, as any sharecropper could tell you.
That's a messy generalization about the causes of mental illness, and any Behavioral theorist can trace both character flaws and *some* personality and neurological disorders back to improper rearing and abuse, with many patients experiencing these problems being exarcerbated by one another. Nurture is just as important as nature as far as clinical depression, sexual disorders, and even some intellectual disabilities. Check out John Money and the Boy With No Penis, then try to relegate mental illness and suicide to physiology. If the human mind was simple enough that we could understand it fully, we would not be able to understand it at all. I agree that cultural bias on the part of the practitioner has no place in the mental health system, and I feel your pain whenever topics such as rape culture or conversion therapy rear their ugly heads.
>>18472
You're very right. I place some of the blame for the romanticism surrounding depression not only on the mystery, but on the otherwise very constructive coping method of sublimation. Great artists such as Kurt Cobain have used their talents to cope, only to see those talents cast the anguish they tried to escape in a favorable light. In this way, great art is a memetic cognitohazard, whereas uncreative manifestations of sublimated depression fail to act as a vector for the mental illness and emotional pain that inspired them. FDR sought solace in being a workaholic, made a great impact on the world around him, like Kurt Cobain, but did not transfer his pain. At least 3 suicides have been directly linked to Cobain's, but for the record, he was suffering from a great deal more than just depression. Bipolar disorder for sure, addiction, and possibly even gender dysphoria.
I also dispute your statement that other mental disorders are far more ostracized than depression. Histrionic and Avoidant PDs are semi-consciously encouraged, hoarding maintains a freakshow catharsis that has been wildly exploited in infotainment media such as the television show, addiction is actively glorified in pop culture (Lil Peep, Nathaniel Rateliff, etc.), and fantasy ideas of Antisocial PD schizophrenia and necrophilia have united an entire subculture for 30 years. Woop woop much clown love.
>>18488
Yeah, like watching a tiger in a cage, some things can only be appreciated when you're safe from them. Excellent point.

 No.18500

>>18490
>Attitudes like that further fuel the cagey mentality of the modern Black person. Getting these people on their feet required more than breaking their chains, as any sharecropper could tell you.
Okay, how much more? Regardless of the cause, a reprehensible mentality is still nothing to admire.

 No.18502

>>18500
a lot of the opportunity to be proactive has passed. They're doing better now, I see a lot more black people in the suburbs and in positions of leadership at their work. This is because opportunities started opening up slowly over the past 30 years as racist attitudes and segregation receded. Both of which were huge economic and educational obstacles.
Had the post-Lincoln presidents tried to interfere in the postwar South to educate freed slaves and thusly enable them to diversify economically and participate in skilled trades (which are the best way to start a trans-generational social climb) they might have been able to mitigate the lost economic opportunities posed by racist attitudes in the North and South. And killing the exploitative and destructive sharecropper system would have been a boon in itself, in some ways it further degraded black opportunity to improve their condition.
Wealth, skills, and intangible advantages such as mentality are passed down through generations. This is why poverty is cyclical: if you come from nothing you have nothing to use to improve your living, reducing your chances of doing so, and having advantages to give your offspring. Because these advantages could not develop under slavery, no wealth for the next generation to inheirit and no precedence of success for them to draw from, the freed slaves did not have the tools that some migrants and middle class whites had. A jumpstart was needed, but once the war was done nobody cared. Hell, a lot of the free staters and abolitionists still wanted nothing to do with the blacks. Lincoln himself cared only for the preservation of the Union and democracy.
This is a community that lost everything when they left Africa, was denied the opportunity to start anew for 300+ years, and was economically hampered even outside of the plantation slavery model by precedence-inspired racism. Who will invest or trade with people that they have been taught are incompetent, especially when social pressure is levelled against them for even considering the idea?
A defeatist mentality is inspired, reinforced, and spread through defeat. We have seen this occur in other places, such as the Gaelic nations of Britain. Once the cycle is started, whether by human action or misfortune, it builds momentum both within the hampered community and its neighbors.
In such situations, suffering and dysfunction become normalized and endemic, qnd success becomes alien. Whereas a healthy community will value success, a sickly one values survival.
Perhaps we should take this as a warning sign that American civilization is becoming sickly, that our culture values survival and shames success. Two different adaptations to dissimilar reflections of the same concept: the blacks have no precedent of success to mourn, the rest of America is being influenced by the realization that the good times that we came from are over.
I think the black mentality will end up being more healthy in the long run, at least they have nothing to feel that they have fallen from, with that, the demand of strength might find itself greeted by a mass awareness that things can only get relatively better

 No.20008

>>18450
>Do you think our society likes to glorify mental illness
Aren't pride parades just that?

Anyway, this phenomena is nothing new, you can trace it back to Victorian era and probably even further in history, goth and emo scenes were just that.
Regarding depression: Self pitying is addictive and since misery loves company, self pitying people come together and try to get others to give them sympathy, and since people are egoistical by nature they prefer receiving sympathy over giving it, and in order to appear more deserving of attention they blow their pain out of proportion, then start believing it themselves and make it real.
And its not just psychological problems, people like to brag about being gluten/lactose intolerant too.

 No.20020

No. Anyone who does has never suffered horrible anxiety or depression. Try going on an alcoholic binge and then glorifying the after effects. Anyone can do it and it sucks.

 No.20045

>>18472
You can't /thread yourself



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